Our Blog

RDG Veteran’s Program

November 11th, 2015

We’ve got big news! Historically, our honored Central Oregon Veterans have had to drive to Portland to receive treatment. But now, Redmond Dental Group is partnering with the Department of Veterans Affairs to allow eligible Central Oregon Veterans to receive local care from non-Veteran Affair dental providers.

“We are happy to deliver dental services to our much deserving local Veterans so they no longer need to drive to Portland for treatment,” said Dr. Max Higbee, owner of Redmond Dental Group and a veteran.

Dr. Higbee served as a dentist in the United States Army between 1969-1971 during the VIetnam War. Upon completion of his service, Dr. Higbee began his private practice in Redmond, Oregon in September, 1971. Due to his passion for his patients and a forward thinking philosophy, his practice continues to grow and expand.

Thank you to Debra for her testimonial about the program:

Dear Jackie,

I am beyond happy to refer other veterans to Redmond Dental Group. The care I have gotten there is beyond awesome. Everyone there is kind, professional and, actually, lots of fun to talk to. I didn't know what to expect when I started coming there so I was a bit apprehensive but not only do I get timely care I also have experienced almost zero pain or discomfort with the procedures I've had done. The work that's been done for me is excellent. I cannot even begin to convey how happy I am with Redmond Dental Group. Dr. Matt is awesome in his care and kindness.

I just want all of you to know how much I appreciate everything you have done for me. I honestly believe that any veteran coming through your doors will be cared for with respect and kindness. It's great to be so taken care of and it's been awesome to let other veterans know they can get care locally that is, absolutely, the best dental care I've ever had.

Warm Regards,
Debra

Veterans can contact Redmond Dental Group for more information and preauthorization by calling (541) 548-8175.

Best and worst Halloween candy for dental health

October 15th, 2015

As dental professionals, ideally we’d love for our patients to opt for healthy snacks rather than candy this Halloween. However, we know that’s typically not going to be the case. The good news is that it’s possible to fill up your trick-or-treat bag and still be nice to your teeth. Here are just a few of the good guys, along with some you’ll want to avoid so that your scary cavity nightmares won’t become a reality.

Ranked from best for your teeth to worst.

  1. Sugar-free gum is the best treat this Halloween because it leaves no sticky residue and it is sweetened with xylitol--a natural sugar the bacteria is unable to form plaque on. Furthermore, it can actually prevent cavities as it not only dislodges food particles from between the teeth but also increases saliva, which works to neutralize the acids of the mouth and prevent tooth decay.
  2. Chocolate, with no sticky fillings, will generally not stick to your teeth and, therefore, is a much better option if you’re craving something sweet. Dark chocolate is even better, as its antioxidants, according to some studies, can be good for the heart and may even lower blood pressure.
  3. Sugary snacks, including candy corn, cookies, and cake, all contain high amounts of sugar, which can cause tooth decay. Although it’s a Halloween favorite, candy corn is laden with sugar that produces acid that eats away at your teeth.
  4. Although they don’t stick to your mouth, hard candy like lollipops and jawbreakers take a long time to dissolve. The longer a food stays in your mouth, the more acidic your mouth becomes. Jawbreakers actually are hard enough to chip your teeth!
  5. Sour candies are highly acidic and can break down tooth enamel quickly--especially the soft enamel in young children. And while powdery candy, like Pixie Stix, dissolve quickly in the mouth and don’t require chewing, they contain nothing but sugar and can lead to cavities by changing the mouth’s PH and giving bacteria straight sugar to eat.
  6. Chewy/sticky sweets, such as gummy candies, taffy, caramel, coconut, nuts, and even dried fruit are the worst kinds of candy for teeth because they stick to everything inside of your mouth, including the grooves of your teeth. The longer a food sticks to your teeth, the longer bacteria can feed on it--which could produce cavity-causing acid.

The general rule is that the stickier the candy, the worse it is for your teeth. And if you have the option to go sugar-free, do it! It’ll make us happy the next time you come in for an appointment, and it’ll make your smile happy, too.

What are you putting into the neighborhood trick-or-treat bags? Tell us in the comments!

Don’t forget to join us downtown on Halloween for Redmond’s Festival for the Kids, we’ll be handing out treats in front of the vacant Redmond Athletic Club from 4-6pm!

4 reasons to love fall at Redmond Dental Group

September 17th, 2015

We’re feeling the autumn vibes in Central Oregon! From the gorgeous leaves changing colors all around town to the plethora of pumpkin-spiced foods making our mouths water, we’re loving what fall has to offer. Here are just a few more reasons why:

Our partnership with Coho Coffee Co.

Next time you go for a warm drink at Coho as the weather gets cooler, snag one of our special Redmond Dental Group coffee sleeves and bring it into our office! You’ll get 50% off a teeth whitening treatment, plus $100 off your initial appointment. Then, after you complete your service, you'll get a $5 gift card to Coho Coffee to use on your next purchase! What more is there to love? Just make sure you get ‘em before they’re all gone!

The Festival of Cultures

We’re proud to sponsor this great event! Brought to you by the Latino Community Association, it includes international music, food, song, dance, cultural displays and booths, and an official citizenship ceremony. Be sure to enjoy this event that’s free to the community on September 26 in Centennial Park. And stop by our booth from 10-6 to grab a goody bag with toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and a $100 off card!

Launching our Veteran’s Program

Exciting news! Historically, Central Oregon Veterans have had to drive to Portland to receive treatment. But now, Redmond Dental Group is partnering with the Department of Veterans Affairs to allow eligible Central Oregon Veterans to receive local care from non-Veteran Affair dental providers. Dr. Higbee served as a dentist in the United States Army between 1969-1971 and is happy to deliver dental services to our much deserving local veterans so they can now receive treatment closer to home. Veterans can contact Redmond Dental Group for more information and preauthorization.

Fall colors

As if our view of Bowlby Park right outside our windows could get any better, the trees are starting to change color and it’s looking as pretty as ever! Snap a photo and share it on our Facebook page next time you’re in the dentist chair.

What should I do about thumb sucking?

August 29th, 2015

While comfort for many adults may mean Netflix and tea or a nice afternoon on a paddleboard with a craft brew in hand, for babies it often manifests in. For him or her, it feels calming when they’re tired, scared, bored, sick, adjusting to challenges such as starting daycare or preschool, or trying to fall asleep at night.

Your preschooler most likely practiced this habit in the womb and perfected it as an infant. Most children stop sucking their thumb on their own between the ages of 2 and 4. Some continue the habit longer, but peer pressure in school is often an effective deterrent. However, this can significantly impact the health of your child’s teeth by damaging the alignment of the teeth and jaws.

Curbing the habit

Since children usually don’t realize that they are sucking their thumb, there is no sure way to break the habit. And methods like covering up their thumb can seem like a harsh punishment since they are seeking comfort through the act of thumb sucking. The best way to mitigate the habit may be to preempt the triggers with other options. See below for examples.

  • If your child's thumb becomes red and chapped from sucking, try applying a moisturizer while he or she is sleeping. (If you apply it when she's awake, it may just end up in her mouth.)
  • If your child tends to suck her thumb when hungry, she can learn to ask for a snack instead.
  • If they do it while watching television, consider giving them something else to hold to distract them, like a rubber ball.
  • If he tends to suck his thumb when he's tired, you could try letting him nap longer or moving up his bedtime.
  • If she turns to her thumb when she's frustrated, help her put her feelings into words.

Don’t worry too much

The American Dental Association says most children can safely suck their thumb until their permanent teeth begin to appear (usually around age 6).

Keep in mind, it’s the intensity of the sucking and the tongue’s thrust that can deform teeth to make braces necessary later. Observe your child's technique. If he or she sucks vigorously, you may want to begin curbing the habit earlier, say around age 4. Otherwise, waiting it out should be just fine.

If you notice any changes in your child’s mouth or teeth, or if you're unsure whether their thumb sucking is causing problems, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 541-548-8175. You could save time and money down the line by acting now.